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Author Topic: Headless SIP softphone?  (Read 3690 times)
adapted.cat
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« on: July 03, 2009, 06:17:23 PM »

Maybe somebody here has already done this or plans to.

I currently have Skype set up with a USB adapter connected to both corded and cordless phones.
Skype is not an option for the SheevaPlug for several reasons, so I'd like to replace it, and finally turn off the computer that's sitting there with just Skype running.

What I think I need is a headless SIP+SRTP client that can accept dialtones over a USB adapter and ring the phones via that adapter, and service with a SIP provider that gives me the ability to make/receive calls. That's the bare minimum - optional extras would be a web-based GUI, a speed-dial address book, fixed-point arithmetic codecs, and caller ID.

What I don't want is an X GUI requiring me to have e.g. KDE running just to get the phone working. And I don't need IM chat, video, or even necessarily SMS support - I can do those with other software. I also shouldn't need a full PBX, since the intercom between the cordless phones works just fine for internal calls.

Questions:
1: Does my list of requirements sound right?
2: Is there software out there that could be made to meet my needs?
3: Can someone point me to a list of SIP providers and their prices?
4: My current USB adapter is Windoze only - what ones can I use with a SheevaPlug?

I'm not afraid of porting to the ARM if that's necessary. I have lots of experience of porting between various platforms. Complicated configuration files don't scare me either, and if the answer is that I need to write a bunch of scripts to interface with some daemon/library well then I'll do what I can. But I don't want to have to write my own SIP client for this.

Thanks in advance!
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smartboyathome
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« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2009, 06:30:24 AM »

One thing I know exists that lots of other people use (especially people within enterprise environments) is Asterisk, and since it is open source, you should only need to recompile it for ARM to get it to work.
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ReverseEngineered
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 10:13:49 AM »

I would love to do something similar, but despite some heavy reading, I'm still lost on some of the details.

Where do I find a provider to get my VoIP onto the plain-old telephone system (POTS)?  With an Asterisk server and an FXO, I can get hook my analog telephone up to VoIP, but then how do I get it back into POTS to call people?  How do I get a POTS-accessible telephone number and, preferably, how do I do that while keeping my existing number (not my existing line, but transfering my existing number to that new line)?

I've tried hard to find VoIP providers, but everytime I look I end up finding people making hardware or intranet services.  Am I missing something?  I basically just want something like the MagicJack -- plug my telephone in and make calls to other people's telephones, but send it over the internet at a fraction of the cost of what my local telephone service charges.
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Lorilie10
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2009, 08:46:18 PM »

Why won't you use softphone rather then usb VOIP phone? What I think I need is a headless SIP+SRTP client that can accept dialtones over a USB adapter and ring the phones via that adapter, and service with a SIP...





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adapted.cat
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« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2009, 07:02:51 PM »

Thanks for the link to asterisk. I was aware of that for larger PBXs, but I didn't know it could be used for such a small setup.

To answer Lorilie's question, I already have regular corded and cordless phones, and that's what I want to use. I don't want to spend hundreds just to replace my existing phones when they work perfectly well with Skype right now.

I've had similar luck to ReverseEngineered in finding providers. Plus, they all seem to cost about 10 times as much as Skype and not support any security features like SRTP. Looks like the cheapest option is to just stick with what I have...
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