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Poll
Question: I have experienced
no failure to date in my Plug's power supply - 38 (33.9%)
a failure of my Plug's power supply after running it on 120V - 24 (21.4%)
a failure of my Plug's power supply after running it on 240V - 50 (44.6%)
Total Voters: 110

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Author Topic: Poll: Sheeva Plug Power Supply failures - does the mains voltage matter?  (Read 26329 times)
restamp
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« on: March 15, 2010, 09:46:04 PM »

More data gathering...
« Last Edit: March 15, 2010, 09:48:03 PM by restamp » Logged

restamp
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2010, 10:05:58 PM »

Hmm.  Although I've left this poll open, and thus the results may be subject to change, it surely appears that the PS failures that have been plaguing some forum members recently seem to only be affecting those Plugs being powered from 240V mains.  Perhaps one or more of the PS components are not up to the task of handling the higher voltage.

I wonder in 240V locales whether it might be worth powering the Plug through one of those small-wattage 240V-to-120V step-down transformers that they sell here in the US for tourists venturing overseas?  These small transformers are fairly cheap and easily found by googling for them.  Might be cheap insurance.  Just a thought.
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birdman
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2010, 06:05:21 PM »

..seem to only be affecting those Plugs being powered from 240V mains.
...or the number of users with 240V vastly outnumbers those with 120V?
Or those with 120V don't fill out polls?
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restamp
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2010, 07:19:37 PM »

Maybe, but as Damon Runyon once observed:  "The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, but that's the way to bet."

Actually, my best guess is that there are more 120V users out there.  How long has the Plug been marketed in Europe and Australia?  Complaints about failing PSs seem to have ballooned in the past few months.
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ON1DQD
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2010, 08:37:17 AM »

Hi,

Need help on repair power supply!!!

Any help is welcome!!!

Best regards,
Geert - ON1DQD
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CharlesWGreenJr
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2010, 01:11:24 PM »

How about replacing the 'no failures' option with two:  'no failures and I run 120' and 'no failures and I run 240'?  Maybe then we can get a better handle on the total number of lo/hi voltage runners out there?

Hmm.  Although I've left this poll open, and thus the results may be subject to change, it surely appears that the PS failures that have been plaguing some forum members recently seem to only be affecting those Plugs being powered from 240V mains.  Perhaps one or more of the PS components are not up to the task of handling the higher voltage.

I wonder in 240V locales whether it might be worth powering the Plug through one of those small-wattage 240V-to-120V step-down transformers that they sell here in the US for tourists venturing overseas?  These small transformers are fairly cheap and easily found by googling for them.  Might be cheap insurance.  Just a thought.
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restamp
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2010, 02:59:12 PM »

I'm not sure how polls work under SMF, but I think if I alter the Poll in any way, it will likely reset all the counts.

However, I was having a conversation about the Plug's "240V" power supply problem with a colleague over lunch just today, and he brought up an interesting point:  I had been presuming that the problem is related to voltage, but he pointed out that it could just as easily be a 50 Hz vs. 60 Hz phenomenon.  As most 240V mains are also 50 Hz, it might be difficult to determine which vector is causing the failures by simply polling.  In any event, the above poll seems to substantiate that something in the current design of the Plug's PS is overstressing a component to the point that it fails when used on a 240V and/or(?) 50 Hz supply, but is reliable on 120V 60 Hz.

Does anyone power their plug from a 240V 60 Hz source?  What about a 120V 50 Hz source?  If so, I'd be interested in hearing how long your plug has been running and whether or not you have experienced any failures.
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digininja
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2010, 05:01:11 PM »

The power supply in my first Sheeva died after a few months, plugged it in one day and it went bang and smelt of burnt electronics.

I called Globalscale to see what I could do and finally got permission to send it back. They acknowledged receiving it and then confirmed the power supply was dead then it took 2 months of me calling and emailing and then cc'ing in the sales and marketing departments before they got back to me again to say that they were sending out a replacement.

The new one has been OK so far but whenever I plug in the power lead there is usually a small spark which is a bit worrying.
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dattaway
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2010, 05:28:23 PM »

Higher voltage.  Loud boom.  I would wager capacitor failures. Usually a semiconductor failure will activate the fuse without much drama.

Anyone who had a failed one took pictures of the board?
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digininja
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« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2010, 03:05:52 AM »

I was going for a replace under warranty so didn't pop the lid, if this one goes though I'll pop it, take the photo then probably take a hammer to it and buy something more reliable next time.
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fragfutter
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« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2010, 08:09:23 AM »

joining the club. Blown Caps after 8Months running on 220Volts. USB Hub with seperate power.
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grothoff
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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2010, 01:21:24 AM »

I have had a plug run fine for over a year now at 110V with USB memory stick, and another one (without USB-load, but with somewhat heavy overall system load) just failed after less than 3 months (blinking light, otherwise dead).  Replacing the power supply worked just fine (now using an external one).  I have posted a picture of the broken one (since some of you asked for one): http://grothoff.org/plug_psu_broken.jpg
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guidol
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« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2010, 11:37:45 PM »

Iam running my Sheeva at 220/20V here in Germany.
But only with SD-Card and a USB-Soundcard (low Power Device).
An external USB-HardDisk should use his own power-supply.
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kaeso
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« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2010, 02:19:14 AM »

It looks like guruplug is suffering the same problem.
Mine lasted exactly two hours (from unboxing) with no activity and no usb/eth cable connection, just plugged into a European/Italian network (230V-50Hz).
Unfortunately, I noticed how common is this kind of failure in this forum only after the damaged happened  Sad
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asteriosd
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« Reply #14 on: May 21, 2010, 11:07:45 PM »

Yesterday, my sheeva died after 6 months of non stop usage. It was connected to an APC 1500 VA UPS system with output 240v/50Hz (along with other devices). and with a 2TB jbob system of 2 3.5'' HD. I opened the PSU and found out that the output capacitor (1000uf/6.3v) was blown. I am not sure about the health of the voltage regulator but to be on the safe side I will change this also. I think that the design of the power supply is relatively simple and there is no need for a complete schematic in order to repair it. The only components that can not be easily replaced are the 2 transformers, but I suppose that this will rarely happen. If for some reason the replacement will not succeed then I will follow the external PSU solution.
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