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Author Topic: Much better than a nslu2?  (Read 6746 times)
Trune
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« on: January 16, 2010, 05:20:53 PM »

Hi all,

i was wondering if many of you have came from nslu2's?
I have one at the moment and i think its probably a bit slow for what i need.

Will i be disapointed with a sheevaplug?
At the moment i use the slug for samba to host 1.5tb hard drive (fat32), 1tb hard drive (ntfs but maybe ext3), 500gb hard drive (ntfs). Also use it for dyndns updates, and ftp server.

At the moment i get around 4mb a sec transfer rates over samba, will i see this get better on a sheevaplug?
(it will be hard wired into 100mbit port but serving to computers connected on N Wireless)

Also i take it its easy enough to install stuff like slimserver, proftpd just like the nslu2?

Thanks in advance.
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UnaClocker
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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2010, 08:06:25 PM »

I'd recommend setting your drives up in a Linux native file system. It puts less overhead on the CPU, is more reliable, and faster.
If you want to host to a -N wireless network, 100mbit isn't fast enough. The Sheeva has gigabit ethernet, you should use a -N router with Gigabit ethernet ports.
That said, here's a screenshot from my plug's Status monitor, while I was copying a large file off of a USB hard drive that is plugged into it.

You said you get 4mb / sec, looks like (from the Net Up: status) I was up around 9mb / sec, which it held steady at during the whole transfer. I'm on a 100mbit network, Gigabit switch is on my to-do list. The plug and the comptuer receiving the file were connected with cat5, no Wifi for anything but my laptops/phones in the house. The USB hard drive is a 3.5" 1TB Seagate formatted ext2. I'm running Debian Lenny and a very recent kernel that was posted here.
Hope that helps.
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pingtoo
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2010, 08:23:09 PM »

I have nslu2, I have two 300GB connect to it, I NFS share them to my other machines, the share was use for back up and software download. I use openwrt on the nslu2.

Performance is funny thing Tongue, it all depend on how you fell. the NSLU2 work fine for me as a simple back storage server a for software download archiving. originally I want it to do more but I am limited my its internal storage space so in that regard I am not happy.

Disclose, my sheevaplug ATM is only acting a development environment it does nothing.

Compare to spec. sheevaplug have 512MB internal storage, 512MB memory, 1.2GHz CPU, NSLU2 8MB internal storage, 32MB memory and 266/133 MHz CPU. I think the NSLU2 can not do everything you want at same time. Sheevaplug have better chance.

Will you be disappointed? I don't know. Roll Eyes read this forums you certainty can find some disappointed user Shocked It all depend on you. Cheesy
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Good Luck Smiley

Trune
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2010, 12:29:52 PM »

thanks for the response guys, given me something to think about Smiley

ideally id use linux file systems, but its not possible for all the drives.

tbh i cant see the need for gigbit ethernet for an N router, it may well say its connected at 300mbit but i get no better speeds than 100mbit cabled. N wireless seems to be a bit of a scam to be honest.

The N router i got was only 100mbit, and that was about 120, couldnt really find a gigabit one.

I think i probably will go for a sheevaplug, i hope its alot quicker than the nslu2 though Smiley
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birdman
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2010, 01:04:39 PM »

If you want to host to a -N wireless network, 100mbit isn't fast enough. The Sheeva has gigabit ethernet, you should use a -N router with Gigabit ethernet ports.
I agree with this, but most N-routers (especially if they have in-built ADSL modems) only have 100Mb ports.  The only ones I've found (at least when I looked a few months back) have been in the BiPAC series from Billion.
All seems a bit daft to have the wired connexions as the rate-limiting ones.
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UnaClocker
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« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2010, 04:08:35 PM »

Linksys WRT310N is a wifi-N router with Gigabit ethernet ports.. Of course you've never seen better than 100mbit with N if you have it hooked ot a 100mbit router.. Smiley
Honestly, I think the reason all the -N routers are 100mbit right now is simply so that they can charge us all over again to upgrade again in a couple years. Anyways, I'm going down a slightly off-topic tangent.. Smiley
266MHz vs 1.2GHz, yeah, I think the performance difference will be noticeable. Smiley
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c128
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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2010, 03:16:58 AM »

Other N routers than I have owned and used that have Gigabit ports:

D-Link DIR-655 : http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=530
Draytek 2820 : http://www.draytek.co.uk/products/vigor2820.html

On the Slug front.  I previously ran two Slugs - one as a file server and the one as FTP server, web-server etc.
I'd echo the point made about better transfer rates above.  However, the biggest advantage of the two Plugs I now run over the Slugs is their general responsiveness.  I'm a big fan of Webmin for configuration.  Webmin isn't fast at the best of times, but on the Slugs it was next useless due to its, ehh Sluggishness :-).  On the Plugs it's usable.
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birdman
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2010, 02:29:01 PM »

Neither of which has an ADSL modem, and the Vigor one only has 1 Gbit port (the rest are 100/10).

As for the Slug comparison - not only is the processor significantly faster, but you've got more memory, which can help a lot, both in terms of speed and the amount of services you can run.
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Trune
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2010, 12:44:35 PM »

cant help but feel ive been a little misunderstood... lol.
I know you cant get N speeds from a nslu2, but what i said is im not getting speeds faster than 100mbit on a 300mbit N connection. (laptop to laptop for example).
All i mean is that this N stuff seems to be a bit of a con really, you dont get close to 300mbit, tho its ok for getting wired speeds without a cable.

All i want from the N network is speeds to compare with a wired connection. Smiley

And yes, N routers with ADSL modems and gigabit ports are rare in UK at least.

i'll go for a sheevaplug i think, and hopefully i'll be able to get 9mbs on samba.
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c128
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2010, 04:21:23 PM »


Not that it was mentioned as a requirement, but the Draytek does have an ADSL modem - see the link.  I have two broadband connections - one cable, one ADSL - and the Draytek is the (single) router I currently use to manage them.  I had also thought that there was an ADSL version of the DIR-655, but now I look I can't find it.

and the Vigor one only has 1 Gbit port (the rest are 100/10).

...as I said, these are both routers I have owned with Gigabit ports - the Draytek's is a server uplink, but the point was that such routers do exist, even if they are in a minority.


« Last Edit: January 21, 2010, 04:19:03 AM by c128 » Logged

c128
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« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2010, 01:45:02 AM »

i'll go for a sheevaplug i think, and hopefully i'll be able to get 9mbs on samba.

I get around this reliably, so I don't think you'll have any problems on that front.  As above though, one of the other major joys for me in moving to the Sheevaplug was the difference it made in terms of administering the system - my NSLU2s (running Debian) were getting a real pain, in this respect.
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UnaClocker
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2010, 06:02:30 PM »

I'd recommend setting your drives up in a Linux native file system. It puts less overhead on the CPU, is more reliable, and faster.
If you want to host to a -N wireless network, 100mbit isn't fast enough. The Sheeva has gigabit ethernet, you should use a -N router with Gigabit ethernet ports.
That said, here's a screenshot from my plug's Status monitor, while I was copying a large file off of a USB hard drive that is plugged into it.

I updated my screen shot.. Probably should have saved it so you could see them side by side.. Oh well.. It was at about 9845 on the 100mbit router, I got a Gigabit switch, and as you can see, it more than doubled the speed. Smiley 24875 now..
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Trune
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« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2010, 11:48:15 AM »

nice speeds. Smiley

ive got my sheeva plug now, it was a bit of a nightmare to get it upgraded using that installer thing, it just wont work in linux or windows. so i did it all manually in the end.

On another note... plugged in on 100mbit ethernet cable i get 10mbit a sec from samba or there abouts.

Wireless N, connected at 300mbit sat next to the router..... 3.5mbit a second. Which is exactly the same as the nslu2. Seeing as all i ever really use is wireless it seems a bit of a disapointment.
 Obviously not the sheeva plugs fault, but i guess i can demonstrate now that a gigabit router would make no difference to my situation.

ive tried this and that to tweak my wireless network but no noticable luck.

what a shame.


on another note, what status monitor are you using?
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UnaClocker
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« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2010, 11:06:49 PM »

That program is called "conky" I run it through a remote X session so it shows up on my OS X machine. (in XTerm on the Mac, I type xhost + the.sheeva.ip     and on the plug I type "export DISPLAY=the.mac.ip:0.0" then any X app I run shows up on my mac.. Smiley Conky has several themes, I just kind of grabbed the first one that looked like it had the kind of stats I was interested in monitoring.
Should be able to do it on a Windows box as well, if you install an X server.. Seems I remember doing that years ago..
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Trune
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2010, 03:59:06 AM »

any chance of you posting your config file or the link for the theme you used?

thanks for previous info, i have conky running now.
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