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1  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: UBIFS dies -> read-only file-system on: April 03, 2011, 11:45:06 AM
Looks like some genuine file system corruption. For some reason, most flash file system developers seem to believe file system corruption is impossible, thus don't offer tools to check and repair them. UBIFS seems to be similar.

I would suggest to back everything up using a file-based backup program (tar, cpio, ...), reflash the whole plug and restore the [changed] files from the backup.

After the backup and before reflashing, you may want to play with the various debug options in case they give you some hints on how to possibly repair the file system. Or send a bug report. More information can be found in the Linux source tree under Documentation/filesystems/ubifs.txt (or someplace on the Internet like here: http://www.mjmwired.net/kernel/Documentation/filesystems/ubifs.txt

Thanks,
--Christian
2  General Category / General Discussion / Re: MS Windows on Linux on: January 26, 2011, 11:50:18 AM
Yes, but the performance is only acceptable on x86 CPUs. In theory, you could run Windows on the plug in qemu which emulates a whole zoo of CPUs but the performance will be something like an 80MHz Pentium CPU.

On x86 Linux installations, you have the choice between Wine (which emulates Windows by loading Windows executables and mapping the Windows APIs to the corresponding Linux APIs) or various virtual machines like qemu, KVM, VirtualBox, VMware and Xen. However, virtual machines require a Windows license because you install a native Windows operation system into those machines. Wine doesn't need a Windows license because it is effectively a rewrite of all Windows APIs (kernel, graphical environment, DirectX, ...)

Thanks,
--Christian
3  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Internet Connection Sharing on: January 21, 2011, 06:10:55 PM
Which part don't you get?

BTW, I just realized that the command I posted above regarding max segment size missed the parameter for the correct table(mangle):

Code:
iptables -t mangle -A FORWARD -s 192.168.0.0/255.255.0.0 ! -d 192.168.0.0/255.255.0.0 -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu
4  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Internet Connection Sharing on: January 19, 2011, 11:02:01 AM
I'm using my plug as file, mail and Internet server and it's doing NAT for the other computers in the house. So, yes, I'm using iptables to set up NAT and it works perfectly fine. Although my iptables set up includes firewall settings as well...

Thanks,
--Christian
5  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Internet Connection Sharing on: January 18, 2011, 11:33:04 AM
You can use iptables to set up NAT (network address translation). Here's a short explanation:

http://www.revsys.com/writings/quicktips/nat.html

You may want to use a more detailed set up with basic firewall settings, of course. If you're using something like pppoe (e.g. a DSL modem), you may also want to add something like this at the end to make sure your maximum segment size matches the maximum supported over pppoe connections (braindead firewall configurations blocking ICMP all over the Internet will otherwise wreak havok with the automatic detection of the maximum segment size (path MTU discovery); the effect is, for example, that some web sites behind such firewall configurations will appear to hang and never finish loading):

Code:
iptables -A FORWARD -s 192.168.0.0/255.255.0.0 ! -d 192.168.0.0/255.255.0.0 -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu

(this assumes you're using an address in the 192.168.x.x range for your LAN)

Thanks,
--Christian
6  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: Headless X Server on: December 22, 2010, 12:16:35 PM
For what it's worth I tried it (prboom). It does work, however the screen refresh is "wobbly", although the frame rate wouldn't be too bad without the wobbling. I couldn't get opengl working because it seems to inist on DRI and can't use glx...

Wink
7  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: Access USB key earlier ??? on: December 19, 2010, 03:15:30 AM
Sorry, just realized the partitions were reported (well, the one partition you have). Either way, you may also be able to insert a delay in the boot sequence right before the non-root partitions are mounted and checked. This could be done by creating a little delay script in /etc/init.d and the corresponding link in /etc/rcS.d which would need to be named such that it comes before the one that mounts and checks the non-root partitions.

Thanks,
--Christian
8  Hardware and U-Boot firmware / Hardware / Re: Poll: What is the status of your SheevaPlug's Power Supply? on: December 19, 2010, 03:11:28 AM
I just joined the club of plugs with failed PSUs. Same picture as everywhere else: one of the capacitors bulged, plug failed after around 11 months of continous operation.

Luckily I already had the replacement PSU from New IT so it's up and running again. The capacitor that bulged was one of the smaller ones, the one between the switch transistor and the transformer. The smaller capacitors seem to have been replaced by different types on the new PSU, which gives me some hope Wink

Thanks,
--Christian
9  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: Access USB key earlier ??? on: December 15, 2010, 01:25:53 PM
I'm missing the part where it reports the partitions on the USB device. Is this stick formatted as a "super floppy" or should there be partitions?
10  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: Access USB key earlier ??? on: December 13, 2010, 12:21:23 PM
The USB stack might not yet have detected the device -- it takes a few seconds to do so and the "mount -a" command might be called before the USB stick is there. One way to deal with this is to add the kernel parameter "rootdelay=10" to wait 10 seconds before mounting the root drive. This also slows down any other mount operation, giving the USB stack time to discover the stick.

BTW, if you don't have a serial port and you change the boot configuration (kernel parameters, fstab, ...) on a plug that boots from the internal NAND, you can easily brick the plug because there's no way how you could fix boot problems without serial port or the JTAG interface. If you already have external USB devices, it might be better to get everything installed on those external USB devices and leave the internal NAND as is...

Thanks,
--Christian
11  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: Guruplug trying to send an email (cron job) on: December 09, 2010, 11:41:19 AM
Who sent this email? Does it have a subject like "Cron <root@xxx> ..."? If so, one of the scripts printed something to stdout/stderr and cron converted the text into an email. In that case, you should be able to get a clue from the subject line (run-parts --report /etc/cron.daily in your case) and possibly from the first line of the email.

Right now the only thing we can tell for sure is that it's one of the scripts in /etc/cron.daily. Maybe you could post the entire email?

Thanks,
--Christian
12  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Spam and new Users on: December 08, 2010, 12:48:37 PM
The new configuration is really annoying -- I don't have time to wait 10 minutes for each post and I guess others won't have time for that, either. Thus, the forum will suffer from the limit of 1 post every 10 minutes.

There must be better alternatives to battle spam. I don't know the forum software but would it be possible to have an admin selectively enable users to post more frequently (say, every 60 seconds) if those users have proved they are not spammers?

Thanks,
--Christian
13  Linux Stuff / General Linux questions / Re: Guruplug trying to send an email (cron job) on: December 08, 2010, 12:30:31 PM
Looks like you should find the corresponding script in /etc/cron.daily. It could also be that one of the scripts writes something to stdout/stderr which would cause crond to try and send an email to root which in turn may have been redirected to another email address in /etc/mail/aliases.

Thanks,
--Christian
14  Linux Stuff / Kernel / Re: mmc issue with eSATA plugs on: December 08, 2010, 12:07:14 PM
Quote
This does seem to eliminate the problems I reported in my first post. As to whether this is an appropriate way to fix those problems ...?

Looks fine to me at a glance. Maybe you want to send an email to Martin, or submit a defect on bugs.debian.org, so he can have a look and fix the Debian kernel?

Thanks,
--Christian
15  Linux Stuff / Linux distributions / Re: Debian on a non-dev-kit SheevaPlug? on: November 30, 2010, 01:25:46 AM
Sorry, just realized you already tried sheeva-uboot-tools. Your plug may have the different checksum method for the configuration. Have you checked this thread:

http://plugcomputer.org/plugforum/index.php?topic=117.15

Thanks,
--Christian
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